Study In USA

Country’s currency: United States Dollar
Country’s capital city: Washington
Country’s population: 324,577,640 is the population of USA
Country’s Indian population: Indian-Americans numbering 3.34 million are the third largest Asian community in the US
 

Country’s higher education system

First Level: Undergraduate

  • A student who is attending a college or university and has not earned a bachelor’s degree, is studying at the undergraduate level. It typically takes about four years to earn a bachelor’s degree. You can either begin your studies in pursuit of a bachelor’s degree at a community college or a four-year university or college.
  • Your first two years of study you will generally be required to take a wide variety of classes in different subjects, commonly known as prerequisite courses: literature, science, the social sciences, the arts, history, and so forth. This is so you achieve a general knowledge, a foundation, of a variety of subjects prior to focusing on a specific field of study.
  • Many students choose to study at a community college in order to complete the first two years of prerequisite courses. They will earn an Associate of Arts (AA) transfer degree and then transfer to a four-year university or college.
  • A “major” is the specific field of study in which your degree is focused. For example, if someone’s major is journalism, they will earn a Bachelor of Arts in Journalism. You will be required to take a certain number of courses in this field in order to meet the degree requirements of your major. You must choose your major at the beginning of your third year of school.
  • A very unique characteristic of the American higher education system is that you can change your major multiple times if you choose. It is extremely common for American students to switch majors at some point in their undergraduate studies. Often, students discover a different field that they excel in or enjoy. The American education system is very flexible. Keep in mind though that switching majors may result in more courses, which means more time and money.

Second Level: Graduate in Pursuit of a Master’s Degree

  • Presently, a college or university graduate with a bachelor’s degree may want to seriously think about graduate study in order to enter certain professions or advance their career. This degree is usually mandatory for higher-level positions in library science, engineering, behavioral health and education.
  • Furthermore, international students from some countries are only permitted to study abroad at a graduate level. You should inquire about the credentials needed to get a job in your country before you apply to a postgraduate university in the USA.
  • A graduate program is usually a division of a university or college. To gain admission, you will need to take the GRE (graduate record examination). Certain master’s programs require specific tests, such as the LSAT for law school, the GRE or GMAT for business school, and the MCAT for medical school.
  • Graduate programs in pursuit of a master’s degree typically take one to two years to complete. For example, the MBA (master of business administration) is an extremely popular degree program that takes about two years. Other master’s programs, such as journalism, only take one year.
  • The majority of a master’s program is spent in classroom study and a graduate student must prepare a long research paper called a “master’s thesis” or complete a “master’s project.”

Third Level: Graduate in Pursuit of a Doctorate Degree

  • Many graduate schools consider the attainment of a master’s degree the first step towards earning a PhD (doctorate). But at other schools, students may prepare directly for a doctorate without also earning a master’s degree. It may take three years or more to earn a PhD degree. For international students, it may take as long as five or six years.
  • For the first two years of the program most doctoral candidates enroll in classes and seminars. At least another year is spent conducting firsthand research and writing a thesis or dissertation. This paper must contain views, designs, or researches that have not been previously published.
  • A doctoral dissertation is a discussion and summary of the current scholarship on a given topic. Most U.S. universities awarding doctorates also require their candidates to have a reading knowledge of two foreign languages, to spend a required length of time “in residence,” to pass a qualifying examination that officially admits candidates to the PhD program, and to pass an oral examination on the same topic as the dissertation.

International student population in country

The USA has the world’s largest international student population, with over 800,000 students choosing to broaden their education and life experience in the United States.

Rankings and position at global platform

In the list of world education ranking by times higher education world ranking 2013-14 out of top ten nine universities are from the USA.

Highlights of ranking universities
1 California Institute of Technology (Caltech) United States   94.9
2 Harvard University United States   93.9
3 Stanford University United States   93.8
4 Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) United States   93.0
5 Princeton University United States   92.7
6 University of Cambridge United Kingdom     92.3
7 University of California, Berkeley United States   89.8
8 University of Chicago United States   87.8
9 Imperial College London United Kingdom   87.5
10 Yale University United States   87.4
11 University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) United States   86.3
12 Columbia University United States   85.2

Programs and courses offered by country

  • T Accredited
  • Arts and Design
  • Aviation
  • Bachelor Degree
  • Business
  • Computer Science
  • CEA Accredited
  • Culinary
  • Economics
  • Education
  • Engineering
  • Environment/Development
  • Executive and Professional
  • Health and Wellness
  • Hospitality and Tourism
  • Law Schools/Programs
  • Liberal Arts
  • MBA
  • Marketing & Communications
  • Master/Doctorate
  • Medical/Dental
  • Nursing
  • Online/Distance Learning
  • Psychology
  • Science
  • Technology/Computers

Entry criteria

U.S. universities and colleges usually base their admissions decisions on a student’s academic record and applicable test scores, such as TOEFL, the SAT or ACT. If you are applying to graduate schools, additional exam scores, such as the GRE or GMAT, will be required.

International students must also take a test that measures English language proficiency. These tests are given at test centers around the world. They are “standardized,” so that students take the same test at every test center. Your scores give the admissions office a uniform international standard for measuring your ability in comparison with other students.

Fees structure

Entrance Exams: $500

College or university admission exams, such as the SAT, TOEFL, and GMAT, can cost from $50 to $500. There may be additional fees for processing, sending your scores to schools, etc. You may have to take the exams more than once, so set aside the funds to do so.

Application Fees: $250 – $600

Application fees to cover administration and processing range from $50 to $75 per application. Most applicants apply to four to ten schools.

Tuition: $3,500 – $30,000

Tuition costs vary greatly from school to school and location. Depending on where you choose to study, your annual tuition can average from $3,500 to $30,000. Typically, English as a Second Language (ESL) schools and community colleges cost less than colleges or universities. State schools, which are financed by the local state and U.S. government, cost less than private colleges or universities. However, most state schools charge a higher “out-of-state” rate for international students and you should budget for annual inflation of tuition costs, around five percent

Admission procedures

  1. S. universities and colleges usually base their admissions decisions on a student’s academic record and applicable test scores, such as TOEFL, the SAT or ACT. If you are applying to graduate schools, additional exam scores, such as the GRE or GMAT, will be required. Your test scores are sent directly to the schools to which you are applying. You will be asked to indicate the names of these schools when you register to take certain tests, such as the SAT or ACT. In the case of computer-based tests, you will designate the schools at the exam site and the testing agencies will mail your scores directly to them. There will be a fee for scores that you request at a later date.
  2. After the application deadline, you will begin receiving letters from your chosen schools. Some universities inform candidates of their acceptance soon after their documents have arrived in the admissions office; this is called “rolling admissions.” Other schools, however, wait several months and inform all candidates at one time.
  3. The admissions office or graduate school department will send you information about their academic programs and an application form. (You might be able to obtain a specific school’s application form online or at your local educational advising center.) If you are applying to a graduate program, your marks from university or college will be taken into consideration.

Intakes

School year begins in August or September in the United States

Visa policies and procedures

  • An F-1 visa is issued to international students who are attending an academic program or English Language Program at a US college or university. F-1 students must maintain the minimum course load for full-time student status. They can remain in the US up to 60 days beyond the length of time it takes to complete their academic program, unless they have applied and been approved to stay and work for a period of time under the OPT program, as described below. F1 students are expected to complete their studies by the expiration date on their I-20 form (Certificate of Eligibility for Nonimmigrant Student Status) which is provided by the US college or university that the student has been accepted to and will attend.
  • Different universities have different admission policies. Your university will inform you what they need from you in order to determine that you are academically eligible.
  • Once the university has determined that your application is complete and you are academically eligible, they will issue an I-20 form to enable you to apply for your student visa. Applicants for student visas should generally apply at the U.S. Embassy or Consulate with jurisdiction over their place of permanent residence.
  • A F1 visa interview will be required to determine whether or not you are qualified to receive an F1 student visa. You should arrive at the interview with all of the required documents and receipts, and you should be prepared ahead of time to answer personal questions about your decision to study in the US.
  • F1 visa interview questions often include inquiries about your academic qualifications and choice of university. You may be required to prove that you have ties and obligations that would guarantee your return to your home country after your international studies. Most importantly, you will be required to prove that you have the means to finance your education. Education in the US is higher than most countries and being able to present a solid financial plan for the duration of your studies is crucial to pass your F1 visa interview.

Documents required to process visa application

Gather and prepare the following required documents before your visa interview:

  • Passport valid for travel to the United States – Your passport must be valid for at least six months beyond your period of stay in the United States (unless exempt by country-specific agreements). If more than one person is included in your passport, each person who needs a visa must submit a separate application.
  • Nonimmigrant Visa Application, Form DS-160 confirmation page
  • Application fee payment receipt, if you are required to pay before your interview
  • Photo – You will upload your photo while completing the online Form DS-160. If the photo upload fails, you must bring one printed photo in the format explained in the Photograph Requirements.
  • Certificate of Eligibility for Nonimmigrant (F-1) Student Status-For Academic and Language Students, Form I-20A-B or Certificate of Eligibility for Nonimmigrant (M-1) Student Status for Vocational Students, Form I-20M-N – Your school will send you a SEVIS-generated Form I-20 once they have entered your information in the SEVIS database. You and your school official must sign the Form I-20. All students, their spouse and minor children if they intend to reside in the United States with the student, must be registered in the Student and Exchange Visitor System (SEVIS). Each person receives an individual Form I-20.

Additional Documentation May Be Required

Review the instructions for how to apply for a visa on the website of the embassy or consulate where you will apply. Additional documents may be requested to establish that you are qualified. For example, additional requested documents may include evidence of:

  • Your academic preparation, such as:
  • Transcripts, diplomas, degrees, or certificates from schools you attended; and
  • Scores from tests that your U.S. school required, such as the TOEFL, SAT, GRE, or GMAT;
  • Your intent to depart the United States upon completion of the course of study; and
  • How you will pay all educational, living and travel costs.

Standard visa processing timing

After your VISA interview you will leave your passport with the US Embassy after the appointment. Expect to receive your visa and passport back within an average of 5-7 working days.

Benefits and opportunities

While studying and after studies On completion of your degree, you are legally authorized to work in the US in your related field for about a year. You need to apply for Optional Practical Training Employment Authorization (OPT). Most international students get inducted into the company that hires them during their OPT period, by sponsoring their H1-B or work visa.

Spouses and dependents

  • Spouses, including same-sex spouses, and/or unmarried children under the age of 21 who wish to accompany or join the principal visa holder in the United States for the duration of his or her stay require derivative F or M visas. There is no derivative visa for the parents of F or M holders.
  • Family members who do not intend to reside in the United States with the principal visa holder, but wish to visit for vacations only, may be eligible to apply for visitor (B-2) visas.
  • Spouses and dependents may not work in the United States on a derivative F or M visa. If your spouse/child seeks employment, the spouse must obtain the appropriate work visa.
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